Lessons Learned from the Great Declutter of 2017

Nostalgia

Who knew joining Kathi Lipp’s clutter free challenge would impact more than the condition of my house?

As I rid my home of excess stuff—and believe me, there’s lots of it—the most amazing changes are taking place inside of me.

So what principles am I learning that will impact my writing and writing-related projects?

Narrow Your Focus

In the past, I have tried to get my household in order. I would tidy and clean a room only to become overwhelmed by all that remained to be done and would give up.

This time it’s different. The challenge is to toss or re-home a mere 10 items per day. I rarely stop at 10, but once that’s done, I gain a sense of accomplishment and can go on with my other responsibilities.

I’m learning to approach my writing and editing projects in the same way. I add fewer things to my daily schedule and choose one or two main projects for the week.

This has helped me gain a greater sense of accomplishment and you may find it does the same for you.

Ignore the Clock

My hubby and I have been married for almost 35 years. It has taken even longer than that to accumulate all the stuff in our home. I have to give myself a break when it comes to the process of decluttering.

And speaking of time …

It may be a throwback to those old ticking clocks that reminded us just how quickly time was passing. But even without that constant reminder, I find myself checking the time in the corner of my computer screen.

Even though I’ve pared down my To Do list, regularly checking the time reminds me that I’m not going to get everything done that I would like to on any given day.

I find, however, if I focus on the project rather than the clock, I have a much greater sense of accomplishment.

What about you? Does the clock motivate or discourage you?

Rejoice in Small Victories

With each box of books I take to the library, each bag of items I drop off at the thrift store, each bag I put at the curb on trash day, I feel lighter. The same is true of every cleared surface and every emptied corner.

I’ve learned to be satisfied with even those 10 items dealt with rather than focussing on the thousands I haven’t gotten to as of yet.

Do you want to write a series of books? Do you want to win Camp NaNoWriMo? Do you want to publish an ebook?

No matter what writing dreams you have, it all starts with that first chapter, that first paragraph, that first sentence.

And when you get it written, smile, rejoice in your accomplishment, and then get back at it.

To ensure that you stick with it until your project is done, schedule it into your planner—in pen.

Don’t Become Overwhelmed

I look to my left and see one of my catch-all rooms. I look to my right and see the laundry room bulging with items we rarely, if ever, even look at.

But do you know something?

They’re a little tidier than when I start this challenge.

If I considered how much I’ve still got to deal with, I could easily become overwhelmed.

When it comes to anything, including our writing, refusing to become overwhelmed ties in with rejoicing in the small victories. It also ties in with our focus.

When you can, focus on one project at a time.

If that isn’t possible, at least zero in on what you’re doing at any given moment. Devote yourself to it wholeheartedly. Fight the urge to think of all the things you’re not doing.

Stick with It

The current clutter free challenge ends with the close of Lent. However, I have promised myself that I will continue to get rid of at least 10 items per day until our home is the way we want it.

I have many writing and writing-related goals for the years to come.

The only way to achieve these goals is to stick with it for the long haul.

What goals do you have? What can you do today to achieve those goals? How can you ensure that you will persevere until you reach them?

 

Contributed by Stephanie Nickel, CES writer and editor

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