How Camping Improves Your Writing

Camping

Ever imagined writing the first draft of your novel in 30 days?

That’s the whole premise behind NaNoWriMo, National Novel Writing Month. In November, writers from all over the globe sign up to write 50,000 words in a single month. And many of them are successful.

Although I’ve never participated in NaNoWriMo, I have attended Camp NaNo on a number of occasions. In fact, I’m in the midst of the July challenge now. Camp NaNo is a virtual experience that happens in April and July each year.

Unlike its namesake, Camp NaNoWriMo is not about writing 50,000 words—unless that’s the goal you set for yourself. Instead, you can choose from a few different goals: word count, time spent writing, etc. Plus, you’re free to write nonfiction if that’s what you’d prefer.

This month I’ve set a goal of 10,000 words. That should be easy to hit before July 20, when I head out on holidays with my hubby.

So why participate?

Productivity

As I’ve mentioned, campers set their individual goal. Your homepage included a target and an arrow. As you enter your word count, the number of minutes you’ve spent writing, or whatever measure you’re using, the arrow moves toward the 100 percent ring. It’s fun to watch it move every time you make a new entry. But not only is it fun, it also motivates you to keep at it.

Comradery

Writing can be lonely work. It’s just you and the screen (or the blank piece of paper). And if you’re one of the rare breed, as I am—an extrovert who writes—this community can provide some much needed human contact. Although it’s optional, I would encourage you to join a cabin. You can let the camp directors assign you to one or your friends can choose to camp together. The lady who is hosting my cabin this time round decided to create a Facebook group so we would get notified when one of us posts an update.

Inspiration

The Camp NaNo community is fun, it nurtures creativity and allows campers to be as social (or reclusive) as they choose. You can pop onto Twitter and join the word sprints (which is how I’m finishing this post). There are also write-ins you can participate in. If you’re stuck and don’t know what to write, the team suggests optional prompts to get those creative juices flowing.

Accountability

Whether you join a cabin and report on your progress or whether you simply watch the arrow on your target move toward the 100 percent ring, the process will give you a sense of accountability. I’m finding this kind of accountability is helping me achieve the goals I set out for myself in a few areas: weight loss, decluttering, and writing.

Plus, it’s just plain fun.

From word sprints on Twitter to hanging out with your cabinmates to watching the arrow move toward the 100 percent ring. All of these are optional, but they add to the whole camp atmosphere.

Participation is free, but you can contribute funds so the organizers can keep improving the Camp NaNo experience. Plus, there is camp-related merchandise to purchase. Because I live in Canada, it makes the cost of shipping prohibitive. But if you live in the US, you may want to check out the camp store.

If you’re participating in Camp NaNo or have done so in the past, I’d love to hear about your experience. And whether you “win” or not, you’ll be that much closer to your writing goal.

 

Contributed by Stephanie Nickel, CES writer and editor

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