Nostalgia-Inspired Writing

Nostalgia

by Stephanie Nickel , CES Editor, Writer, Coach, and Critique Specialist


I took my daughter out for lunch to celebrate her new job. While we were at the mall, we popped into a video store that carried DVDs of all the old—and new—TV shows. Talk about a walk down Memory Lane. There were shows I’d long forgotten and those I remembered fondly—plus those at which I shake my head and wonder why I ever watched, but, as the saying goes, that’s another story.

After that we popped into a Laura Secord’s. French mint chocolates and chocolate bars. Jellied fruit slices. Butterscotch kiddy pops. Even a discussion with the clerk about Laura Secord Easter eggs. Talk about reawakening memories of my youth—and possibly adding a pound or two just through osmosis.

It’s funny what will stir “the warm fuzzies” inside us. And while they’re stirred, let’s use them to fuel our writing.

Try one or more of these ideas . . .

1. Think about your earliest memory and write a journal entry as if you were that child.

2. List the #1 thing for each sense that evokes happy memories (i.e.: the smell of warm chocolate chip cookies; the taste of maple walnut ice cream, etc.). Incorporate all of them into a short story.

3. Visit a video rental store and borrow a DVD of a TV show or movie you watched as a child. Before you watch it, describe it as you remember it. After you view it, write your current thoughts. (My husband and I got up in the wee hours of the morning to watch an episode of “Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.” Believe me, we only did that once. [grin]) We have definitely been spoiled by advanced special effects, high-calibre scriptwriting, and excellent delivery by the actors—in many cases at least.

4. Search the Internet for pictures of toys from your childhood. When you come across one of your favorites, write a conversation between yourself and a young child who has never seen the toy.

5. Search YouTube for songs from your youth or your favorite musical artists from the era. Listen to one or more of these songs and use them to jumpstart a freewriting session.

6. Make a point-form list of your top ten happy memories. Use them to inspire a poem.

And if you’ve had a challenging past, memories can still spark your writing. Use even the difficult times to help you determine what nonfiction topics to write about. Use these times, too, to make your fiction characters three-dimensional. No matter how happy, no one’s past is completely carefree.

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