Make Time to Write

ideaUnless you write for a living, you may wonder how on earth you will ever find the time to write. And even if you earn an income from one type of writing, you may want to venture into another style or genre.

The truth is you will never find the time, but you can make it.

Here are 10 ways to do just that:

  1. Set your alarm back a half hour and use that time to write. Don’t allow yourself to get distracted by all the other things calling your name even before you get out of bed.
  2. Instead of watching TV after the children are settled in for the night, sit down with a pen and paper or in front of your computer and write for an hour.
  3. Keep a notebook by your bed. If a wonderful idea strikes you as you’re nodding off or when you first awaken, write it down. You may think you’ll remember it, but you may not.
  4. Keep another notebook with you at all times. A snippet of conversation, an observation, even a fleeting thought can serve as inspiration for your writing. (I’ve had a character’s name rattling around in my head for the longest time.)
  5. Back to the idea of conversation . . . You may want to keep a separate notebook for quotes you come across that grab your attention. (Years ago, I bought my son a pair of army boots. They really were too big, but he wanted them and this mama wanted to make him happy. At church the following Sunday, one of our older friends asked, “Hey, Boots, where are you taking that boy?” I’ve never forgotten the quote, though until recently, I didn’t know how I would use the question as inspiration for my writing.)
  6. Instead of surfing the Net, texting, or reading one of the many e-books on your phone (if you’re anything like me), use those found minutes to jot down ideas in your notebook . . . or on your phone. You may even want to write a line or two for that story that’s beginning to take shape. Those moments will add up—and so will the ideas.
  7. If you’re stuck, why not search YouTube for instrumental music that doesn’t bring lyrics to mind? Use it to fuel your writing.
  8. Grab your camera—or your smartphone—and go for a walk. Snap lots of pictures. Some of them may serve as inspiration for future writing projects.
  9. Are you interested in writing for children? Picture Book Idea Month (PiBoIdMo) is simply amazing. Each day of November, you can read posts by professionals in the industry. And your only commitment? To come up with 30 ideas for picture books during the month. Plus, you’ll have several chances to win amazing prizes.
  10. Sign up for October Poetry Writing Month (OctPoWriMo)—even if you’re not a poet. It’s a wonderful way to make yourself write 31 poems in 31 days.

How do you make yourself write?


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by Stephanie Nickel , CES Editor, Writer, Coach, and Critique Specialist 
 

 

Please visit our websites: Christian Editing ServicesCreating Christian Books for KidsPray for Ministries around the World, and Find Christian Links 

Questions? Email karen@ChristianEditingServices.com

Time Travel

Pocket watch with starfish in the sand on the beach

When someone says, “historical fiction,” what comes to mind? How about researching an event from days gone by? Does this fill you with curiosity and anticipation? Or does the very thought of it make you yawn.

Here are six ideas to try even if history isn’t “your thing.”

  1. Do a little digging into your family history until you come across an interesting character you would like to learn more about. And then dig some more.
  2. Look into the history of your hometown. Record details you find captivating. Use these to write a piece for the local paper or as a springboard for a short story.
  3. Imagine yourself without modern day conveniences. Write a journal entry as if you were an earlier settler to your area. Do sufficient research to get the facts right.
  4. Is there a destination you’ve always wanted to visit? Virtually all have a rich history. Since you are beginning from a point of interest, studying their history should be more intriguing.
  5. What do you love besides writing? Fine art? Architecture? Photography? Choose something that interests you and do some research into its beginnings.
  6. Still not interested in ancient history—or even what happened in the 1800s? Consider the significant changes you’ve seen in your lifetime and try your hand at a creative nonfiction piece (a true story that incorporates setting, dialogue, and conflict as you would read in a work of fiction).

And now, it’s time to hop into your time machine and head off for the future. Even if you’re not a sci-fi fan, there are ways to approach the future that may very well spark your interest. Give at least one of these ideas a try in the week ahead.

  1. Let’s start by taking a small leap forward. Write a journal entry as if it were 10 years in the future.
  2. Look ahead and imagine your great, great grandchildren. What do you think their world will look like?
  3. So much has happened in the last century. It’s mind-boggling. Now picture yourself as a 22nd century reporter. You’re sent to cover the inventor of the most recent technological advancement. Write out that interview. Remember to cover the who, what, when, where, and why of the story.
  4. Imagine that because of overcrowding, you have to choose to live on Mars or under the sea. Which would you choose and why? Write in as much detail as you can.
  5. So, since we mentioned sci-fi, why not turn our gaze to the heavens? Write two pieces, a fantastical piece of what it would be like to encounter aliens and a piece in which you simply share your thoughts and feelings about seeing the heavens from deep space minus the alien lifeforms.
  6. If you’re so inclined, write a dystopian short story. (This isn’t my preferred genre, so perhaps I should give it a try to expand my writing horizons.)

We’d love to hear which of these ideas you used as writing prompts. Did they give you a new view of the past or the future? How so?


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by Stephanie Nickel , CES Editor, Writer, Coach, and Critique Specialist 

 

 

Please visit our websites: Christian Editing ServicesCreating Christian Books for KidsPray for Ministries around the World, and Find Christian Links

Questions? Email karen@ChristianEditingServices.com 

Keep Writing for the King

Now Laban had two daughters: the name of the elder was Leah, and the name of the younger was Rachel. Leah’s eyes were delicate, but Rachel was beautiful of form and appearance. Now Jacob loved Rachel; so he said, “I will serve you seven years for Rachel your younger daughter.”

And Laban said, “It is better that I give her to you than that I should give her to another man. Stay with me.” So Jacob served seven years for Rachel, and they seemed only a few days to him because of the love he had for her.
Genesis 29:16-20 NKJV

Have you ever felt like the unwanted on or the unattractive one? Leah did. By birth, she was Rachel’s older sister, and by her father’s trickery and deceit, she was Jacob’s first wife. Can you imagine what she must have felt like when Jacob looked at her and realized she wasn’t Rachel, the one he was deeply in love with and had worked seven years for? I’m sure the rejection she felt stung to the bone.

God loved Leah and had a plan and destiny for her life. She bore Jacob six sons and one daughter. Levi was one of the boys born to Leah and Jacob. The priestly tribe came from this lineage. Judah was another son born to Leah and Jacob. King David came from the lineage of Judah—and so did Jesus Christ.

cropped-write5.jpgYour Father has a plan for you, too. You might feel others can write better and are having more success in their writing endeavors than you. Stay faithful. Keep writing. Don’t compare yourself with someone else. Be authentic. Be transparent. Be the one God created you to be. God has a destiny for you and your writing. You never know where He will send your stories. Keep writing for the King.


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by Dixie Phillips, CES Editor, Writing Coach, Award-Winning Children’s Author and Songwriter 

Please visit our websites: Christian Editing ServicesCreating Christian Books for KidsPray for Ministries around the World, and Find Christian Links

Questions? Email karen@ChristianEditingServices.com 

The Power of the Written Word

The day before what would have been my maternal grandmother’s 100th birthday, I spotted an old letter crammed in the back of a dresser drawer.

Senior writes a testament“Wow! This letter is over 30 years old,” I gasped when I saw the postmark. “And it’s from Grandma!”

I plucked the three-page letter from the tattered envelope and began reading. Immediately tears trickled down my cheeks.

                Dear little Dixie,
                I love you more than you’ll ever know . . . 

Discovering Grandma’s letter reminded me of the power of the written word, whether a simple note or professional manuscript. Our words have power to impact the reader and keep memories alive.

Sometimes we make the mistake of thinking every time we write, it has to be something profound, but I’ve discovered more often God uses the everyday experiences of life to minister to others.

I want to share a piece I wrote about my paternal grandmother’s death. I never dreamed my “common” experience of losing a grandmother would resonate in the souls of so many, but it did, and I have had numerous requests for reprints.

Never underestimate “your” story. God may just use it to heal the brokenhearted and your words could touch a generation your eyes may never see. Keep writing.

_____________

Mable

The move from a spacious home to a small, one-bedroom apartment was devastating to Grandma Eleanor. Devastating, but necessary, because of a terminal inflammatory breast cancer diagnosis.

In her apartment complex, other women who were experiencing the same pain she was—terminal illness, limited income, loss of spouse to death or a nursing home—surrounded her. A remnant of these women formed a weekly Bible study. Grandma became a faithful member. This band of women became kindred spirits as they prayed for one another and comforted one another from God’s Word.

It became apparent by fall Grandma would not be with us much longer. Her spirit was strong, but her body grew weaker. The Sunday before Thanksgiving, she had to be hospitalized. The cancer had metastasized to her lungs and colon.

Word spread quickly among her little Bible study group that Eleanor was dying. Some had seen the ambulance take her away. Loving cards and concerned phone calls began pouring in.

Wednesday morning a knock came to her Hospice room.

“Mable, how did you get here?” Grandma asked.

“Took a cab, Eleanor. I just had to.” Mable tiptoed to Grandma’s bedside with a brown grocery sack in her arms. “It’s cold outside, but it was warm in the cab!”

“Oh Mable, you shouldn’t have come out in this bitter cold.”

“I had to, Eleanor! Christmas is coming. I wanted you to have your Christmas card and the gift I made for you! It’s all right here in my bag.” Mable rummaged through her grocery sack, pulled out a bright red envelope, and tore it open. “Let me read it to you.”

Mable cleared her throat and continued,

               “What can I give Him poor as I am?
                If I were a shepherd, I’d give Him a lamb.
If I were a wise man, I’d do my part,
I know what I’ll give Him,
All of my heart!”

Tears glistened in Grandma’s eyes. “Thank you, Mable.”

“That’s not all, Eleanor. There’s more! Christmas is coming! I just wanted you to have your Christmas present a little early this year.” Mable pulled out a small package topped with a recycled bow.

Grandma was too weak to open her gift. Mable handed it to me. I gently tore the paper off the box and opened the lid. Peering back at me was a teddy bear holding a lacy parasol.

“Yep, it’s true, Eleanor! Christmas is coming, and I just had to give you your present a little early this year.” Mable reached for Grandma’s hand.

“Mable, thank you for being my friend this past year. You tell our little group good-bye for me. Thank them for all their prayers. Tell them I’ll be spending Christmas with Jesus this year.”

Tears trickled down Mable’s face and fell on her quivering lips.

“I love you, Eleanor!”

“And I love you!” Grandma replied.

Mable collapsed in my arms and wept.

After Mable left, I stood beside Grandma’s deathbed. I placed the little teddy bear on the table. I realized Grandma’s “home-going” would be soon. I looked at the teddy bear holding the lacy parasol and reread Mable’s Christmas card, “What can I give Him poor as I am?”

I realized that I had just witnessed these verses lived out before my eyes. A loving friend with meager means had given her very best. She even celebrated Christmas before Thanksgiving knowing my Grandmother wouldn’t live to see Christmas this side of heaven.

I closed my eyes and silently thanked God for giving me such a wonderful grandmother, and for giving my grandmother such a wonderful friend.

Grandma went home to be with Jesus two days after Mable’s visit. She did just what she said she would. She celebrated Christmas with Jesus!


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by Dixie Phillips, CES Editor, Writing Coach, Award-Winning Children’s Author and Songwriter

 

Please visit our websites: Christian Editing ServicesCreating Christian Books for KidsPray for Ministries around the World, and Find Christian Links 

Questions? Email karen@ChristianEditingServices.com 

Self-Discovery

Birth of IDEA. Concept background.Most—if not all—of us have “ah ha” moments in life, moments when we learn something new about ourselves.

But do our characters?

These moments need to be part of not only the hero’s journey but also the other main characters’ in our works of fiction as.

Let’s use that as our springboard this week.

  1. Introduce your main character to a sibling he didn’t know existed. What does your character learn about himself in the process?
  2. When a grouchy old woman responds kindly to a homeless man, she goes on a journey of self-discovery to find out why. What does she learn about herself?
  3. The child in your story is afraid of bright lights. He asks his older sister about it and she tells him a story about a time he was a toddler. What does she say?
  4. A recently released convict comes across her grandmother’s diary. The young woman had no idea about her family’s past. What does she learn about them—and herself?
  5. Tormented since he began Kindergarten, a high school sophomore moves to a new town and has a fresh start. What does he learn about himself on the first day of class?

And for you fantasy writers . . .

  1. Your human antagonist awakens to find herself surrounded by aliens. Her only hope of figuring out what is going on . . . the man she came to kill.

Take your time and think through each situation. It’s easy to fall into cliché responses. Instead, be careful to make each discovery believable. Set the scene carefully, thoughtfully. Your characters have to have a legitimate reason why they say and do things, especially those that seem out of character.


by Stephanie Nickel , CES Editor, Writer, Coach, and Critique Specialist

Please visit our websites: Christian Editing Services and Find Christian Links

Questions? Email karen@ChristianEditingServices.com

Get in Your “Write” Mind

And then God answered: “Write this.
Write what you see.
Write it out in big block letters
so that it can be read on the run.”
Habakkuk 2:2 MSG

Holy SpiritOn my past blogs, I have shared samples of some of the stories I have written for my family. After my grandmothers’ passing, I realized much of their legacy would be lost if someone didn’t document their stories. The great-great-grandbabies being born now might never know how our family came to Christ. I wanted to document as much of it as I could.

I’d like to point out that you don’t have to be a Karen Kingsbury to write your family’s story. Just start writing. Don’t dwell too much on proper language mechanics. Just get your story on paper. There are people with large gifts of writing who can help you bring your story to life. The main thing is for you to dust off your keyboard or pick up your pen and get busy writing. Your family will thank you.

After a loved one has died, I’ve never heard adult children say, “They wrote down too many things. I don’t have time to read all the stories they jotted down.” But I have heard many of them say, “Oh, I wish I would have had my grandmother write down that funny story or favorite recipe. Man, I’d give anything to ask Grandma about that!”

You have a story and even possibly a book inside you. Don’t listen to anyone or anything that tries to insinuate you are not smart enough! Time is marching on. Soon it will be too late. Begin today. Your family will be very thankful for the gift you’ve left for them. Get in your “write” mind today.

I would like to share my great-grandmother’s testimony with you. Six generations have been influenced for Jesus because of her choice to follow Christ. One woman, one choice, and six generations! Amazing, isn’t it? I hope you enjoy the story of my great-grandmother Ada Stillion.

One Woman, One Choice, Six Generations

Ada poured the last few drops of the bottle of rubbing alcohol into her cup of coffee. Taking a big gulp, she growled at her husband, “Ed, we’re out of moonshine, and I’ve used the last of my rubbing alcohol to stop these tremors!”

Edward hissed back, “Addie, you best get on down to your brother Mel’s house and get us some more brew. We’re low on cash, and if we could do some bootlegging, it might help get us caught up.”

Ada’s brother lived in Metropolis, Illinois, eight hours away from the small town in Iowa where Ada’s family lived. Every few months Ada and her daughter, Nettie, would take a trip to load up on some of Kentucky’s white lightning. They would bring some home and sell most of it to their kinfolks, who were slaves to whiskey too, but this trip God had something else planned for forty-five-year-old Ada Stillion, something that would change her life forever.

“Mel, it’s so good to see you!” Ada cooed as she hugged her older brother.

“Ada!” Mel exclaimed. “So much has happened to my family since we last saw you.”

“You got any good whiskey?” Ada asked. “I’m spitting cotton. Let’s sit down and have a stiff drink and then you can tell me all about it.”

“Addie, I don’t drink anymore.” Mel shook his head. “You’ll find no whiskey in our house! I’ve met Jesus!”

Ada shot back, “Are you trying to tell me that you done got religion?”

“No, Addie! I met Jesus.” Mel reached for his sister’s hand. “Tonight we’re having revival meetings at our church. Oh, Addie, you’ve just got to come. I have found what we’ve been searching for.”

“Church? You want me to go to church?” Ada’s eyebrows stood at attention. “I ain’t never been to church in my life!”

Nettie stiffened and poked her elbow in Ada’s side. “Ma and me are going to Kentucky tonight. We’ve got some important business to tend to. Don’t we, Ma?”

Mel’s moist eyes met Ada’s. “Please come. You’ll find what we’ve been looking for our whole lives.”

“Well, I guess going to one church service ain’t gonna kill us,” Ada chuckled. “What time should we be ready?”

“Seven o’clock sharp!” Mel let out a whoop. . . .

“Listen to that beautiful singing!” Ada motioned for Nettie to sit on the back pew. “Have you ever heard such singing?”

Nettie snarled, “Don’t know why they are singing about blood. That’s kind of gory, don’t you think, Ma?”

Ada pressed her finger to her lips. “Shhhhh. Listen!”

What can wash away my sin?
Nothing but the Blood of Jesus!
What can make me whole again?
Nothing but the Blood of Jesus!

Ada sat mesmerized by what she heard and felt.

After the singing a minister stood behind the pulpit. “We all are sinners and need a Savior.”

Ada had flashbacks of her daughters and how alcohol had robbed them of a decent childhood.

The pastor invited all who wanted their sins forgiven to come forward and kneel at the altar. Ada stood to her feet, walked down the aisle, and knelt at the altar. The minister prayed with her and then asked her if she would like to pray.

Tears poured down Ada’s cheeks. She called out to God for the first time in her life. “Lord, forgive me of my sins and make me worthy to be called mother.”

When Ada stood to her feet, she knew she was a new creature in Christ. Old things had passed away and all things were new!

“Nettie, we aren’t going to Kentucky to buy any whiskey!” The trip to Kentucky was canceled. Ada never touched another drop of liquor the rest of her days. She lived to be ninety-two years old and shared her salvation experience with anyone who would listen.

Ada Stillion was my great-grandmother. Her decision to follow Christ has impacted six generations. She followed Christ. Her daughter accepted Jesus. Her granddaughter invited the Lord into her heart. Her great-granddaughter committed her life to Jesus. Her great-great-granddaughter dedicated her heart and life to the Lord, and even Ada’s great-great-great granddaughter has given her life to Christ.

Great-Grandmother could have left our family a legacy of alcoholism and abuse; instead she left us a legacy of God’s amazing love. God answered her prayer and made her worthy to be called Mother. In fact, He made her a spiritual mother of many.


by Dixie Phillips, CES Editor, Writing Coach, Award-Winning Children’s Author and Songwriter 

Please visit our websites: Christian Editing Services and Find Christian Links 

10 Easy Steps to Avoid Writing

How can you avoid writing? Try these 10 easy steps!

  1. woman in doubtDream about all the books, blog posts, and articles you want to write.
  2. Constantly build your library and read, read, read some more.
  3. Pursue everything interesting that comes your way.
  4. Justify that extra half hour of sleep in the morning and kicking back in the evening. After all, you need your rest.
  5. Ask yourself repeatedly, “Does the world really need another book? Do I have anything worthwhile to say that hasn’t been said a million times before?”
  6. Convince yourself that you wouldn’t want to see your byline on a newspaper or magazine article or your name on the cover of a book if you were truly humble.
  7. Fill your day with all those urgent things that call your name.
  8. Let each day unfold come what may.
  9. Bee-bop around your social networks. You wouldn’t want to miss anything.
  10. Remember tomorrow is a new day.

Actually, there is nothing wrong with any of these things . . . if we let them serve as springboards for our writing.

Dreaming about what to write is our pre-planning stage. We just can’t get stuck there.

Stephen King has been quoted as saying, “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” Reading is good, both nonfiction and fiction. We just can’t read so much that we don’t take the time to write.

Being eclectically interested and knowing that amazing things have come my way from a variety of sources makes me inclined to flit around like a butterfly. However, we all have to buckle down and write knowing we just might miss something along the way, but that’s okay.

Getting sufficient sleep is extremely important. However, we won’t just find the time to write if it isn’t our day job. We will have to make the time.

Years ago, I read that no one will say something exactly like I will. We each have a unique perspective and a unique “voice.” Plus, it’s important to remember how many times we’ve read or heard the same thing, but there comes that time when it really hits home. You may be the one to write something in just the way your reader needs to hear it.

It’s important to do whatever we do to the best of our ability—even writing. Sometimes we will be acknowledged for our achievement. This often opens doors to even more opportunities, and that’s not a bad thing. More open doors for our writing means more readers reached.

Stephen Covey referred to the urgent and the important. The ringing landline. The chiming cell phone. The Facebook message. These are among the urgent things that call us away from what is truly important. If our writing is important, we must let our calls go to voicemail, silence our cell phone, and set aside specific times to check emails and social media—and stick to those times.

Not every day will unfold the way we plan, but we do need a plan. Somewhere between scheduling every waking minute and scheduling none is the right balance. And in that balance, we must include our writing projects—not just writerly pursuits, actual writing.

There are countless great writing blogs out there in cyber space and countless writers with whom we can connect. It’s always incredible when a favorite author actually answers our email, but if they didn’t sign out for significant portions of the day, they wouldn’t get anything written—and neither will we.

Procrastination can rob us of so much that is truly important. However, at the end of the day when we haven’t accomplished all we’d like, it is a very good thing to remember that, indeed, tomorrow is another day.

All the best for all your tomorrows.


by Stephanie Nickel , CES Editor, Writer, Coach, and Critique Specialist

Please visit our websites: Christian Editing Services and Find Christian Links 

Moses Was a Basket Case

Then Pharaoh gave this order to all his people: “Every Hebrew boy that is born you must throw into the Nile.”
Exodus 1:22 NIV

mosesI love the biblical account of an infant boy named Moses. Satan conjured up a plan to kill him, but God was watching over the little guy. Jehovah gave Moses’ mother a creative plan to save her baby’s life. She built a basket made out of bulrushes and coated it with pitch.

When she saw that he was a fine child, she hid him for three months. But when she
could hide him no longer, she got a papyrus basket for him and coated it with tar and pitch. Then she placed the child in it and put it among the reeds along the bank of the Nile. His sister stood at a distance to see what would happen to him.
Exodus 2:2-4 NIV

Even though Moses was a “basket case,” he grew into a mighty man of God and was handpicked by Jehovah to deliver the Israelites from the land of bondage.

My husband and I have been in fulltime ministry for more than 30 years. We have seen firsthand the enemy sabotage ministries in their infancy. We’ve stood in the gap with those God has called for a heavenly assignment and rejoiced with those who fulfill their divine destiny, but our hearts have broken when we watched others allow the wicked one to snuff out a brand new ministry God had called them to.

I would like to speak directly to those of you who sense the Lord is calling you to “birth” a new ministry, whether it is writing, singing, pastoring, or something else the Lord has laid on your heart.

  • Always ask God for wisdom as you begin this new chapter in your life.
  • Never lean on your own understanding. It doesn’t matter how smart and experienced you may think you are, in your natural fleshly nature you are no match for the devil.
  • Never be shocked by the enemy’s tactics. Remember his goal is to kill the newborn ministry.

The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have 
life, and have it to the full.
John 10:10 NIV

Don’t let the enemy destroy what God is birthing in your life and ministry. Remember the story of Moses. May God use you to lead souls out of bondage.


by Dixie Phillips, CES Editor, Writing Coach, Award-Winning Children’s Author and Songwriter 

Please visit our websites: Christian Editing Services and Find Christian Links 

One Day at a Time

by Stephanie Nickel , CES Editor, Writer, Coach, and Critique Specialist

When I look around—and within—I realize it is a very human thing to look to the future.

When I sell my first article . . .

When I find a publisher for my book . . .

When I sign on with an agent . . .

When the workday is over . . .

When the weekend gets here . . .

When I finally get away on vacation . . .

Making plans isn’t wrong. Thinking ahead isn’t wrong. Looking to the future isn’t wrong.

But . . .

TodayWe are only assured of today.

Yesterday is gone. Hopefully we can learn from it and move forward, but it’s gone.

Tomorrow isn’t guaranteed. If there’s one thing the uncertainty of personal struggles and global turmoil have shown us, it’s the truth of this statement.

I realize, so far, this post has been “a downer,” but that’s not my intention. When I was writing in my journal today, I posed a series of questions like this one: How can I keep my eyes on the Author and Finisher of my faith TODAY?

Let’s focus on today and go from there.

What writing project do you want to work on today?

Set a time to do so and keep the appointment.

What market for your work do you want to research today?

Even if you don’t have a market guide, there are countless resources online. Explore at least one of them today.

What small change will inspire you to write more today?

Make the change and move forward.

What “urgent” thing on your To Do list can you put off until tomorrow so you can be more productive as a writer today?

Scratch the item off your list and rewrite it on tomorrow’s.

What one thing you especially enjoy can you do today?

Don’t make excuses; just do it.

What one thing can you do to make the day special for someone else?

Include this on your schedule and do it. (Remember even the smallest kindness can make someone’s day.)

We mustn’t ignore the heartache and atrocities going on all around us, but sometimes we must take a step back. What can you do to distance yourself from the pain today—and thereby, be better able to take action in the future? (As a writer, don’t underestimate the power of writing to a government official, the editor at a major newspaper, or the readers of your blog. You never know who will read what you’ve written and change the world.)

Take a step back today. Take a deep breath. Determine what good you can do right this minute—and do it.


Please visit our websites: Christian Editing Services and Find Christian Links

The Invisible One

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Dixie Phillips

by Dixie Phillips (http://www.christianeditingservices.com/dixie-phillips.html), CES Editor, Writing Coach, Award-Winning Children’s Author and Song Writer

“He persevered because he saw him who is invisible.” Hebrews 11:27 (NIV)

This scripture has been a tremendous blessing to me and impacted my writing journey. In the life of every Christian writer, we keep pushing our pen because we have seen and been forever changed by the invisible One. As we look upon His face and spend time in His presence, we realize this truth—only those who see the invisible can do the impossible!

  • Where were you the first time you caught a glimpse of the invisible One?
  • When did you sense God calling you to write?
  • Do you remember the first time someone was ministered to by something you’ve written?

One of my favorite Old Testament Bible stories is Elisha and the floating axe-head. Do you remember how the axe-head slipped off the handle, fell into the deep water, and would have been gone forever, but a man of God prayed and miraculously the axe-head floated to the top.

Broken spirits are heavier than iron axe-heads, but when one tiny sliver of Calvary’s cross is inserted into a bleeding heart, the hemorrhaging stops and they rise with resurrection life and beat again. God wants to use your story to be that “tiny healing sliver” from Calvary’s cross.

Whether we are writing for children or adults, God wants to use our stories to change the world one soul at a time. Keep sowing those seeds and pushing your pen. Remember the invisible One is watching and if you listen you might hear Him clapping His nail-scarred hands just for you.